Register Create Account Login

Top Navigation:

Bringing your puppy home

Once your puppy reaches 8 weeks old, it is time to bring them home and meet their new family and home!

Preparation

Be prepared! Make sure that you have all the essential things your puppy will need on arriving at his/her new home:

Use our checklist below:

• Bed
• Bedding – newspaper, towels and blankets
• Hot water bottle – put in the bed to keep your puppy warm
• Water bowl
• Food bowl
• Lead
• Collar with labelled tag with your name, address, telephone number
• Food – consult your breeder before purchasing this
• Toys
• Bones – get advice from your breeder to whether you should give them bones
• Arrange micro-chipping
• Arrange vaccinations
• Take out dog insurance - visit www.dog-breeds.co.uk or www.eandl.co.uk/pet for more information

Puppy Proofing your House

Before you collect your puppy, you should puppy proof the house. Firstly decide how much access the puppy is going to have to the house, for instance is he having the run of the whole house or only allowed downstairs for example. Secondly go around the house moving anything out of the way that the puppy might chew! They tend to be very mischievous so move any shoes, bags, furniture etc. away that he may be tempted to ‘play’ with! It is extremely important to secure all wires and cables away so that the puppy cannot chew through these.

Collecting your puppy

Make sure that you take a box, crate, maybe even a washing up bowl lined with newspaper to put the puppy in. Keep them nice and warm on the way back and if it is a long journey make sure that you offer s/he plenty of fresh water. Do not stop unless necessary as the puppy may be apprehensive as it is, it is better to get the puppy home as soon as possible. The puppy is likely to go to the toilet in the car so line the box with newspaper. Hold the puppy on your knee and stroke them gently to try and reassure him/her.

Introducing your puppy to their new home

Introduce them to their new surroundings slowly. Let your puppy smell and find their way around the house. Do not let them come into contact with other pets as this will frighten them. Children should also be encouraged to tone down their excitement so that they do not worry the puppy. There will be plenty of time to play later!

Introduce the puppy to his/her ‘area’. If you are having a cage, let the puppy sniff it and get used to that and they will venture out in their own time to explore. If you have a bed, make sure that it is in a set area, for instance the utility - quite often it is nice and warm in here and a good place for the dog to sleep. Puppies do spend quite a lot of time sleeping but they will tire you out as they are so active and playful when they are awake! Give them as much attention as possible especially in these early stages.

Be aware that at nighttimes the puppy will cry. They are not used to being on their own plus they have just been separated from their mother. Make sure that you are patient with them as this is a distressing time. They will soon settle down and get used to it. In the meantime you could leave a tape playing in the background when you first go to bed – e.g. a story tape.

You will have to continue with the worming process that the breeder has already started. Ask them for more details. They will also provide you with the tablets and advise when to give them to your puppy. Book your puppy in for vaccinations at the vets, it will need these injections before it can go outside and mix with other dogs. Commence toilet training as soon as the puppy is back at your home. The breeder will have already started this process and it is recommended to follow her tips and routine. Remember, if you encourage your puppy to go to the toilet on newspaper, he will always associate newspaper with going to the toilet! Never tell your puppy off for going to the toilet in the ‘wrong’ place, but be sure to offer lots of praise and rewards for going to the toilet in the ‘right’ place.

See our hints and tips on: feeding, grooming, vaccinations, exercising and training for more information on settling in your puppy!